Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

· Supr Moderator AutoTech SS-Guru Mbr Extraordinaire
2015 High Country Duramax
Joined
·
19,428 Posts
First step would be knowing the different types of regen cycles. That banks unit he pointed out it doesn't show when it's in regen. He circled the stationary regen on there pertaining to the LML and L5P motors. That is a service function, not a monitor. Meaning that it is able to force the truck into an parked "stationary" regen.

The VAST majority of the time these trucks, LMM, LML, L5P, LM2, and LZ0 will do a passive regen or active regen going down the road. They all act rather similar in that the idle will be slightly higher than normal, it may run a little different, and you may not has as much power and you otherwise would. And obviously the smell of HOT exhaust.

A passive regen is when the operating condition of the engine itself do not necessitate the addition of added fuel to bring the exhaust temps up high enough in order to burn the soot out of the DPF.

An active regen is when the operating condition do not allow the exhaust temps to be high enough. So additional fuel is added to the exhaust. This can be done either by the additional injector in the exhaust like on the LML motors (seperate from the DEF injector) or by having an injection even on the exhaust stroke to introduce fuel into the exhaust stream. This added fuel will raise the exhaust temp allowing the soot to be burned off.

And finally you have stationary, parked, or manual regen. Which is where the truck is parked, and the truck will raise its idle and perform an active regen while sitting still. This is not used often and shouldn't be used often. It builds a lot of heat and since there's no air flow from driving, there's no way to keep the heat from staying under the hood and under the truck. Keeping in mind temps can exceed 1200⁰ during a regen. This is typically done if the passive and active regens were unsuccessful while driving due to either operator lack of knowledge, or operating conditions (ie lots of real short trips).

The LZ0 is similar in its after treatment setup to others in the heavy duty side in that it now has two DEF doser injectors. One post turbo, and one before the catalyst. This is the first duramax to have this type of setup. Only time will tell how it works for them.

Once you understand the operating principles of the emissions systems, the more sense it makes. It's also a solid 75%+ of the work I do every day is diagnosing and repairing issues with said systems. Between that, and electrical, it's my bread and butter.
 

· Registered
2023 Sierra LZ0
Joined
·
118 Posts
Well I can give some input on the regen. So today I leave the P-lot at work (left the work car home because I wanted to drive the new truck) and I see my instant mileage is at 25. I'm on a 45 MPH flat road and I know the truck is doing a regen. I'm stopped at a light and I reach in the back seat and grab my i-Dash and plug it in. It took about 12 minutes for the regen to complete. EGT #1 was at 1235deg and EGT #2 was at 1040degs both + or - 20 as I was changing speeds. What's puzzling is there's only 70 miles on the truck. I've had no idle time but who knows what the dealer did while they had it in their possession, so we shall see where this goes.
EDIT: his video is wrong you need to put the latest firmware in and it will display regen status as shown below.

Speedometer Vehicle Gauge Car Tachometer


Hand Motor vehicle Gear shift Automotive tire Finger


Motor vehicle Gear shift Light Plant Steering part
 
  • Wow
Reactions: Red *

· Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Demonworks, good stuff. I think this explains the problem I had with my 2023 LZ0 at 190 miles I get a check engine light and a message that states Service your Emission system, you will be limited to 65mph in 170 miles. I was only doing short trips around town when this happened. This what I explained in another thread I started on first engine check light.

"I wonder if during regen for some reason we get that light and message comes on sometimes during regen. When I picked mine back up from the dealer they were non specific to what they did. I did notice that when I got it back my average mileage had gone from 25.3 to 15.1 mpg and there was only one mile more on the odometer, so I wonder if they just put it in high idle to clear the regen."

So hearing your explanation on regren I bet mine started regen and the short trips didn't allow it to complete regen and that's what caused the check engine light and the message.
I just got the Banks iDash and will get it installed today so I can moniter the regens.

So what would really help is if you could show us how you programed your iDash to show the regens. They have so many perimeters that you can monitor you can get lost.
Again, glad to see you on the forum.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Good to see Demonworks pop up here, I knew you were lurking around on the dmax forums. Maybe since you in here do you know why the lzo doesn't come with the glow plug module that sits above the battery in the top left corner of the engine bay? I am guessing it just got relocated or used somewhere else
 

· Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Regen does not have to complete in a single trip.

If interrupted, it will resume on the next one....
...unless it was close to being finished.
If it aborts, it will wait until the next time it gets to 100 before it restarts.

Mines an LM2.
From time-to-time I change what is displayed, but this is my 'usual'. (DEFLVL and EOT get changed the most)

Automotive tire World Font Gas Circle



DPF SL % - soot level (-- the little black dot blinks green when a regen is active)
DPF RG % - truck regens when it gets to 100. It displays the % of the regen triggers that is the highest. Usually soot, but not always
BOOST PSIG - boost pressure above atmospheric pressure (there is also one for boost pressure absolute)
DEFLVL % - def level
REGEN - ACT = active, OFF = off
-- the little green dot in window #1 blinks when a regen is active
LSTRGN - miles since the last regen completed
EGT1/2 - exhaust temp
GEAR - indicates transmission gear and if it is locked
 

· Registered
2023 Sierra LZ0
Joined
·
118 Posts
Farm guy thanks for the explanation of what the windows in the iDash mean. Going out to put my iDash in now.
Rasty, it's fairly easy. Just make sure you grab the latest firmware from banks ( I believe it's 1.24 but don't quote me on that). Once you do that and upgrade the firmware you will see an entry for the LM2 /0 3.0. Select that as your vehicle and then you can start editing the page layouts with the things you wish to monitor. Keep in mind you can have up to 8 items on each page and there are 5 pages. So you can effectively monitor 40 items but you have to changes pages to view each group of 8. You can also remove fields on a page which allows other fields to be bigger for easier viewing. For such a small package it's a pretty neat device. The one thing I would do is save your pages so if you ever have to reset the gauge you don't have to find all your pages and set them up all over again.

The fields for the regen stuff is under the emissions section of the menus.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Farmguy, using that gauge how long does a typical regen cycle last based on what you have observed?
11 or 12 miles.
I logged start and stop for every one for awhile, but quit because they were always the same.

Still track 'miles between regen finishes', just because I can.

With my usage, average between regens is currently running just over 300 miles.
All the longer intervals shown were when it was when it is working harder - towing and/or higher speed interstate.

Rectangle Slope Plot Font Line
 

· Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Rasty, it's fairly easy. Just make sure you grab the latest firmware from banks ( I believe it's 1.24 but don't quote me on that). Once you do that and upgrade the firmware you will see an entry for the LM2 /0 3.0. Select that as your vehicle and then you can start editing the page layouts with the things you wish to monitor. Keep in mind you can have up to 8 items on each page and there are 5 pages. So you can effectively monitor 40 items but you have to changes pages to view each group of 8. You can also remove fields on a page which allows other fields to be bigger for easier viewing. For such a small package it's a pretty neat device. The one thing I would do is save your pages so if you ever have to reset the gauge you don't have to find all your pages and set them up all over again.

The fields for the regen stuff is under the emissions section of the menus.
Thanks for the tips. I got it in today. Biggest problem is sorting through all the parameters Banks has on it.

Probably need to start a how to for the 3.0 and choices of parameters with the should haves. like the regen.
 

· Registered
2023 Sierra LZ0
Joined
·
118 Posts
Thanks for the tips. I got it in today. Biggest problem is sorting through all the parameters Banks has on it.

Probably need to start a how to for the 3.0 and choices of parameters with the should haves. like the regen.
The cool part is if you can get someone (HINT HINT Farmguy) to save their page set up and post it we can just import that and go from there. I still haven't gotten a chance to set mine up yet for the LZ0. The only field I defined was the regen field because work has been owing me lately. If I get a chance this weekend I will run through it and I will send you the set up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Now you've got ME confused...I'm not sure what 'set-up' pages are being referred to.

First, there is not right/wrong set of things to monitor.

The thing is amazing and is capable for far more than what I do with it.

Any sensor data that is available is there because the truck us monitoring it anyway.
Us looking at stuff the truck doesn't already display is for our entertainment.
The truck is already monitoring and reacting to 'out of range' sensor information.

But, before mounting the unit, plug it into the OBD port an play with it. (might be easier to run it when in hand instead of mounted -- mine is suction cupped to top left hand corner of windshield)
Work thru the manual until getting the hang of working thru the menu's using the arrow keys.

There is a function that allows multiple pages to be loaded/saved -- so they can be recalled instead of re-selecting the codes.
I don't (haven't?) done that. As posted earlier, I do sometimes change the items displayed.

The items that can be displayed are grouped multiple ways in the menus, by type of information. Seems like many of them show up in more than one grouping.
They are listed using a 'name' rather that the address in the computer where the information is picked from.
So, the names with items shown in the idash pics that have been posted are the names that will be found in the menus. (if wanting to look at DEFLVL %, then select DEFLVL %).
The catch with all that is that sometimes the descriptions may not be what is expected. DPFSL and DPFRG might be examples of this.

You do have to select colours, and the number of data windows to display. etc. Doing this helps with learning to use the arrows to move through the menus.

As the pics show, I always use 8, which is the maximum. Manual (downloadable, but also supplied with the unit) shows what the different options look like.
Posters of other idash's often have a different window configuration.
Some have selected the data to be displayed as a bar graph.

The idash will, without changing anything, notify when the trucks fuel or def levels are low. Maybe other stuff too.

I don't believe, for one second, that one of these monitors is a 'must have' for a vehicle with stock programming. I think it is for 'entertainment'. I enjoy seeing how the truck programming reacts to various situations.
I ran 6.6's for about 14 years (LLY, LMM, LML and L5P)
When the LM2 came out I was reading a lot of stuff that I didn't think was correct - especially regarding emission. This was a second reason for the idash was to have 'data' to support my suspicions.


I seem to be rambling, so I'll stop for now.
I'm more than happy to respond to discussion / questions / hints.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Farmguy, great post. What I had on my mind was setting one of the gauges up for emissions so I can see what is happening before and leading up to a regen. That way if it is about to start a regen I could continue in the truck until it completed regen. Anyway to me that seems to be a practical move instead of parking the truck when it is in regen.
Last having just put my iDash in late yesterday afternoon I am still getting the hang of how to program different parameters. So too my point, if there was a simple tutorial to walk us through setting up a guage to do all this with the regen. You seemed to understand a lot more then we do about setting the gauge up.
Given that, I am headed out now to play with the gauge and see what I can do.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
774 Posts
Did you get the version (Datamonster) with the recording capability or the Supergauge?


I don't ever try and start a regen -- one of the reasons is the 'miles per % of soot' is much higher as it approaches 100%.
(not even sure if it can do that on an LM2)

After a regen, it will be back to about 50% at about 50 miles.
My average regen interval is a little over 300 miles.

Regen only takes about 11 miles.
If a regen is interrupted, it will resume after restart -- and total miles will be very close to the same.

And if you are working it hard. soot level can actually go down, due to passive regen.

I think the ones I have at the top will show you what you want.
But, I'm not convinced there is any need or benefit to doing anything different when it is near or at regen. It is interesting to watch.

DPFSL %
DPFRG %
REGEN (ACTIVE / OFF)
LSTRGN - miles since the last regen.

Miles since last regen drops to zero after the regen is completed. It continues to add miles during the regen process.
 

· Registered
2023 Sierra LZ0
Joined
·
118 Posts
Now you've got ME confused...I'm not sure what 'set-up' pages are being referred to.

First, there is not right/wrong set of things to monitor.

The thing is amazing and is capable for far more than what I do with it.

Any sensor data that is available is there because the truck us monitoring it anyway.
Us looking at stuff the truck doesn't already display is for our entertainment.
The truck is already monitoring and reacting to 'out of range' sensor information.

But, before mounting the unit, plug it into the OBD port an play with it. (might be easier to run it when in hand instead of mounted -- mine is suction cupped to top left hand corner of windshield)
Work thru the manual until getting the hang of working thru the menu's using the arrow keys.

There is a function that allows multiple pages to be loaded/saved -- so they can be recalled instead of re-selecting the codes.
I don't (haven't?) done that. As posted earlier, I do sometimes change the items displayed.

The items that can be displayed are grouped multiple ways in the menus, by type of information. Seems like many of them show up in more than one grouping.
They are listed using a 'name' rather that the address in the computer where the information is picked from.
So, the names with items shown in the idash pics that have been posted are the names that will be found in the menus. (if wanting to look at DEFLVL %, then select DEFLVL %).
The catch with all that is that sometimes the descriptions may not be what is expected. DPFSL and DPFRG might be examples of this.

You do have to select colours, and the number of data windows to display. etc. Doing this helps with learning to use the arrows to move through the menus.

As the pics show, I always use 8, which is the maximum. Manual (downloadable, but also supplied with the unit) shows what the different options look like.
Posters of other idash's often have a different window configuration.
Some have selected the data to be displayed as a bar graph.

The idash will, without changing anything, notify when the trucks fuel or def levels are low. Maybe other stuff too.

I don't believe, for one second, that one of these monitors is a 'must have' for a vehicle with stock programming. I think it is for 'entertainment'. I enjoy seeing how the truck programming reacts to various situations.
I ran 6.6's for about 14 years (LLY, LMM, LML and L5P)
When the LM2 came out I was reading a lot of stuff that I didn't think was correct - especially regarding emission. This was a second reason for the idash was to have 'data' to support my suspicions.


I seem to be rambling, so I'll stop for now.
I'm more than happy to respond to discussion / questions / hints.
FARM: What I was referring to was, I have a data monster and a super gauge. Between the two I spent a ton of time setting up all the different fields on my prior Colorado diesel between the two gauges. I hadn't saved the page setups and one of my gauges needed to be factory reset because it locked up. Banks told me I was going to have to reset all the 40 fields on that gauge I had previously set up (lesson learned). So I started saving them to an SD card whenever I made changes. I would send them to other users so they didn't have to waste time reproducing the same settings. They could just simply import the saved pages I had already set up and then add or delete from there. I just haven't had the time yet to set up all the fields that I wish to monitor on my LZ0. So I was just being a lazy smart a$$ when I made that comment.

I had things set up like oil temp that would flash if it went over temp. This was done when one owners (unbeknownst to him) lost his coolant and the water temp sensor had nothing to check temp on. Once the block got so hot for the temp sensor to read it was too late. So I set an oil temp alarm as a backup. There is a lot of things you can do with the gauge if you take the time to address them. It's time consuming but worth it in the long run but save your page settings because it really sucks to have to redo all of them.

Kevin
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top