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2009 5.3l 6l80
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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Yeah, I got the truck very cheap, particularly since the flipper couldn't get it started. Thanks for the pointer to that remote setup, I'll check out how it hooks up to the wiring in the truck, as I prefer to minimize cutting into the trucks harness...
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Looking at that ebay listing more closely, it adds support for remote start, to a vehicle that already has remote locks. It doesn't add remote locks to a vehicle...
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
After work, I started on swapping rear bumpers between the two trucks. Naturally, it started snowing while doing this. And Mitchell's website also decided to lose a bunch of pages, including the one on removing/installed bumpers and their various parts.

So, I decided to just brute-force it, and start unbolting everything that looks like it's holding the bumper on, starting with the main truck & it's bad bumper (it's bent a little and the rubber/plastic fascia won't clip on anymore. I get the outer chrome shell of the bumper off, with using visegrips to hold the elevator bolts used to hold it on.

Move on the parts truck w the good bumper. Try doing the same, get a couple nuts off, but it has the fascia still installed, so I can't readily get visegrips on the elevator bolts. Go inside, google for videos on removing the bumper, and it's way easier than what I was doing, by removing the the bracket the shell bolts to. So, I do that with the parts bumper and get it off, to be installed on the main truck after taking the bumper bracket that's still on it, off.
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Well, good news and bad news. Put on the rear bumper, insured and registered the truck, made sure all the lights worked, and then went for a test drive.

After doing a bunch of stops to burnish the brakes, took it for a test drive on some local freeways. The wheels need balancing (IDK why all the wheel weights would be off them), so I can't really tell if there are other vibrations happening, and it's the usual skittish on bumpy curves, being a unloaded dually, and I could occasionally hear/feel the front shock banging as I haven't yet replaced the lower bushing (the rubber part of it has worn out).

However, after about 25-30 minutes at highway speed (100 km/h about 60 mph), the truck went into limp mode, and then shortly after that it reported low oil pressure (dropped noticeably below the first mark). Stopped and check the oil level, it was still good, the oil pressure was normally staying around the lower dash. 275 kpa is straight up, then one mark on each side, it would sit right around the lower mark (cold it gets a little above the mark, then drops a bit as it warms up). After sitting a couple minutes, fired it up again, and it had better oil pressure (back to around the first mark), and I could drive the rest of the way home normally, as it wasn't in limp mode anymore.

After getting home, it only reported two engine codes P0068 and P0101 on my handheld code reader, I'll poke around more with my laptop running Tech2Win and see if there's more info to find.

So, I'm not sure if I should bother trying replacing the oil pump/o-ring/whatever bits around there, and see if that helps, or just run it as-is for short drives, and rebuild the engine in the parts truck to swap in when it's done. The DIC reports the engine has crazy hours, over 28000, at 220k km, so it's been idled a lot.

And where is the engine hours stored? Is it in the ECM, or the IP, as I'd like to check that info for the parts truck, but part of the wiring is gone, and I'm not sure how much effort it is to swap the parts over to read the info without messing up how the truck works.
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
After this, I replaced the lock/window/power mirror switches in the driver's door, and the plastic latch in the center seat, just to improve usability a bit. Rear passenger window doesn't work, and the others either move slow or are are frozen in place now, so they probably all need some work.

Also measured hitch height relative to my current DD ('04 3500), and got a hitch/ball for hauling my trailer around if needed. Hooked up the trailer to check the connector, and it looks like I need to sort out the left turn signal, trailer brake signal and the power pin.
 

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2010 GMC All Terrain 4x4 5.3 210,000 mi
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The engine hours seem incredibly high! That would be like idling over 7-1/2 hrs every day 365 days a year for the past 10 years.

I just checked mine and it shows 5877 hrs. I was trying to find if I mentioned my hours on here before because mine seems a little low to me.
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Well, after work and some shopping, I tried the "jack up the rear of the truck & add extra oil" technique to check if the o-ring for the oil pickup tube is the problem. Jacked the rear up just over 1', and added 3L of oil to an already full engine, and fired it up.

No change. :-(

Pressure gets up to about midway between the first mark and straight up when cold, and gets up to around the midpoint when the engine is revved to about 2500, but once it gets hot, the pressure drops to the first mark and doesn't vary a lot when the engine is revved.

To me, that means it's more likely to be a bearing problem (vs a oil pickup problem, or an oil pump problem or a sensor problem), where when the oil gets hot it can flow through the worn bearings easier as it gets hotter.

I'll try swapping in the IP from the parts truck to get an idea of what mileage/engine hours are on that engine, and perhaps try turning it over by hand, just to make sure it's not locked up (as it was sold with various bits stripped from it (like interior door panels/hinges/trim/top of fuse box, so not really the sort of stuff thieves would take). And then see about pulling the engine from it in the next couple of days while the weather is up around freezing (vs -10C after that).
 

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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Been working on pulling the transfer case, transmission and engine from the parts truck. Doing it really sucks as while I did get some of the caked on dirt off, there is still plenty on the frame and the rest of the parts, so dirt is constantly falling on my face. Wearing googles has been a big help, but they do fog up with the cold weather.

I've got the TC out, and most of the transmission loose, still need to do the shift cable, input speed sensor if it has one, and the bell housing bolts, so it's close to coming out. I would have done it today, but the temp dropped and the wind picked up, so it was just too cold to spend lying on the ground for a non-emergency.

Instead, I went out and bought an engine load leveller, in preparation for pulling the engine, and starting fabbing up home made versions of GM J-41798 engine lift brackets, as I'm not about to drop $400+US for oem ones (even used ones are stupid expensive). Fortunately, there are some pretty good pics of the brackets, along with bolt dimensions, so it's pretty straightforward to do. I've got the front one done (in the pic), the rear one will be trickier, as the bracket has to be angled to clear the firewall and there's just not a lot of space in the area for quickly doing test fits/adjustments.
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Doing this work did require pulling the exhaust crossover/cat's pipe assembly, I'll swap that into the main truck as well, as it's rusty but not beat up, while the one on the main truck has been partially crushed by hitting stuff. I was a little suprised that most of the exhaust bolts came out without a lot of effort, only one stud broke, on the muffler pipe.
 

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On the mileage to hours part most anyone that drives 90% highway at 70-80 is probably around the 40mph average speed. Thats a TON of idle time, thats crazy.

So doing a full on engine swap now? going to dig into either one?
 

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1999 Silverado LT LQ4 2006 Sierra SLT LBZ
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Why are you even spending time fabbing that bracket up?

Put a bolt in the back left cylinder head, there should be a hole there, and put a bolt in the right front cylinder head. Chains up to load leveler and remove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
The engine in it runs well enough, at least for relatively short trips, so I can use it, so my plan is to pull the parts truck engine, give it new bearings, sensors, a good cleaning and whatever other parts/work it needs, then swap it in.

The brackets keep the chains off bustable bits of the engine, and I'll use them at least 3 times...
 

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Meh if that's whatcha wanna do more power to ya

I would wait on the sensors though. If you end up with problems then I would swap but aftermarket (in this case non-factory) sensors have become absolutely awful as of late.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
One transmission: out
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Only damage was to the shift lever and cable bracket , they both bent from it rolling over getting it off the transmission jack onto the ground, to get it out from under the truck.

I am glad I remembered to put a sheet of plywood down for the jack to roll on, as those tiny wheels weren't going anywhere if it was on the ground.

Currently working on removing the various electrical connectors and brackets on the engine, hopefully get everything disconnected and unbolted tomorrow, then I can work out how to get my engine lift to the truck, and be able to roll it back to the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Decided to pull the intake manifold (this was indicated to do by the FSM) and the water pump and upper radiator shroud (was not indicated by the FSM) so there is more clearance for the engine to move within the compartment.

And I'm not sure why the FSM would indicate to remove the A/C condenser (which is in front of the radiator, and not in the way), but not remove the A/C compressor. I decided to just unbolt the compressor instead, and not vent the A/C system (and I don't have a setup to capture the gas).

Fabbed up a single arm bracket to the rear head bolt (the oem bracket goes to 2 bolts), I'll see how it works tomorrow.

It was dark by the time I got the above done, so I switched to scavenging some parts I'll eventually use, the CV axles, and made a small driver to use with my ball joint press for pushing in/out the lower shock bushing.

Pictured is the bushing I pressed out, a new bushing I bought, the driver I made (looks like a large washer), and an impact socket.
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I used the driver to get the bushing moved a bit, but it turned out I didn't quite make it small enough, as it wedged into the shaft the bushing goes in. After getting it out, I switched to just using the 15/16" impact socket (which I was using between the driver and the ball joint press) to push directly on the bushing, and that did get it out the whole way. I'll just use that on my main truck, as it is the right size to still press on the outer metal shell that the bushing has.

Also tested out putting the hood in the "service" position, which is almost vertical. There are 2 notches on the hinges that you can install a bolt in, that will hold the hood in that vertical position, giving better access to the engine compartment. I just using a piece of wood to hold the hood up, removed the trim pieces by each hinge, unbolted the two hood supports, then lifted the hood to the vertical position (it has stops so it can't fall onto the windshield/roof), installed the bolts and done.
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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
Forgot to add the surprise I got when trying out the shock bushing driver. I was doing it on the parts truck because the wheels and cv axles are off, so I unbolt the shock from the lower mount, and pull it sideways a bit to get it out of the way (to be lazy, and not unbolt the top of the shock). Pulling it sideways a bit, the shock slips out of my hand (this is the gas/oil filled housing) and...slides off the shaft. IDK what happened, the end of the center shaft is threaded on the end, so either whatever goes on the end worked itself free, or the end broke off. It was dark and the center of the end of the shaft is hollow, so I couldn't tell if it's busted off, but it doesn't seem like it's been banging around while being used, so maybe it was ok and my pulling it sideways is what finished it off...
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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Got the engine out today:
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The brackets I made to attach that engine leveller to worked ok, the rear one isn't quite strong enough, so it bent against the coil, but didn't damage it. With the engine out, I'll fab and connect a second "arm" for the rear one, similar to the front bracket, so it can support the engine weight w/o bending.

The hoist hadn't been used in a long time for anything other than hanging things on it to paint. The hose connecting the pump to the cylinder was in terrible shape, mostly because the hose was connected to both w straight fittings, so it was hanging at 90 degrees for years. I put those 90 degree fittings on with a new hose, so the hose isn't under stress like that, and so the hose stays out of the way. I need to rebuild or remake the pump, as it's badly worn. It still works, but leaks fluid. I'm glad I had it, as otherwise, buying one of the new cheap ones, they are MUCH smaller than this guy. It's pivot is about 6'6", and had to be raised to close to it's max height to get the engine over the radiator support. New cheap engine hoists have the pivot point much lower, around 5'-5'6" range, with shorter boom, so I'd have to drop the truck onto the ground, and maybe take out the radiator/radiator support to get it out...

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I had some 4x8 sheets of 3/8" strand board, which worked ok for getting the engine hoist over the ground to the truck, but it wasn't strong enough w the engine on it, and the ground so uneven, the wheels were breaking through it. So, for the return trip, I removed them all, used my truck to pull the hoist most of the way back to the garage, then a come-along to winch it close to the garage door, and finally a 2x4 to pry it into the garage. No chance of pushing/pulling it loaded with the engine, by hand until it got on concrete in the garage.

The plugs don't look so great, they are all pretty oil-fouledwwww
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Tomorrow, I need to get some bolts to mount it on my engine stand and make a oil blockoff plate to do a compression test on the cylinders, before tearing the block down. I've bolted the starter back on, hooked up booster cables to the block and main post, and cut off the starter plug harness, to try out the starter, and it works fine for turning over the engine (course, making a mess w no blockoff plate...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Made good progress on tearing down the engine, w a whole bunch of sandwich bags holding a variety of bolts/parts w labels so I know where they should go.

First, my quick & dirty oil cooler line blockoff plate, just drilled two holes the right distance apart, and then ground a shallow groove in the middle for oil to flow between the two passage. It still leaked a bit, but just drips instead of a steady stream, when turning the engine over to do the compression test.
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Course, I still made a mess, as I had unbolted the valley cover yesterday:
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Zapped some bolts in, and finished doing the compression testing.

3 were at 120
2 at 110
1 at 100
2 at 90
I retested the 90's after squirting some oil in the cylinder, and they shot up to 150. And after getting the pistons out, I found lots of carbon in the top rings, and the top ring was mostly stuck in about 1/2 the pistons.

I was pleased to see that there was very little burnt oil or sludge in the engine, either up top or in the oil pan. Main spot where there was some was on the pistons around the wrist pins, but that's not unusual. The LQ4 in my '04 Sierra, there was/is way more, from when I replaced the oil pan and valve cover gaskets.
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Made a plug on my lathe, then used my 3 jaw puller to take off the harmonic balancer (for this one, that's how you do it). My puller just barely fit, I had to take off 1 jaw, insert the 2 jaws into the balancer, then install the 3rd jaw to get it in place, it pulled it out nicely.
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Pulled off all the rockers, separating them so I can put them back in the same spot (as with the lifters), then pulled the heads:
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Not great, but not terrible either. Not much of a ridge at the top of the cylinders, as the pistons came out easily enough later.

...continued...
 
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