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2004 Sierra 3500 6.0L, auto, extended cab, cab&chassis, upgraded to 4wd
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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Then pulled off the timing chain and out came the camshaft. IDK enough about wear patterns to know if this is bad or not, I would say it's fine and that not of the lifters turned (they are rollers). I'll look up the specs and see if I can measure the lobes to see how much they are worn, to see if I should replace it.
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Shot of some of the cylinders. They all look like this, with just a bit of carbon on the top edge, center "worn" section, then bottom inch or so that still has cross-hatching. I looked at the rod bearings, they all look pretty evenly worn
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I pulled all the bolts from the main bearing caps, but I need to fab a puller to get the caps off. After getting the crankshaft out, all that's left is pulling out the oil divider plug in the rear of the engine, an oil galley plug I missed because it's covered in dirt, driving out the cam bearings and stripping the heads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Forgot to mention, when taking off the exhaust manifolds, about 1/2 the bolts weren't tight anymore, and the gaskets showed that the 4 end ports were all leaking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Today, I started with fabbing a pulling tool similar to the one GM sells (J 41818). I googled for it, and it sells for $70 or more, with one shop wanting $450? crazy.

The main caps are a tight fit into the block, and need to be yanked straight up to not damage anything (either the cap, crank or block). The two posts slide into bolt holes in the cap (which have a smooth bore), then the bolts at the top are tightened (the bolts are screwed into the bottom piece of each post). With the angled cut in the middle of the post, tightening the bolt clamps each post into the hole. Then, attaching a slide hammer to the center hole, which is used to drive out the cap.

Lather, rinse, repeat for each cap. Couple hours, a few bucks in raw materials, and using the slide hammer from a bearing puller set, much cheaper than buying it and waitng a couple weeks for it to arrive.
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Main bearings all looked pretty good, just worn.
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Then out came the cam bearings. Again worn, with the pictured one looking the sketchiest, where it didn't look worn evenly across the bearing (2nd from front):
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Then pulled all the valves from the heads. Used the wrong valve spring compressor to begin with. I've got 3, one for small engines, one for "car" size engines, then one for bigger, industrial engines. I initially selected the biggest one, without comparing it with the medium one, and also not checking that the spring-side fingers were the correct distance apart. The first valve came apart ok, but for the second one, the cap slipped out of the fingers and disappeared into the dark recesses of my garage (it's a mess of projects and stuff). After that, I switched to the other compressor, adjusted it for width, as well as depth, and also covered the end with a rag just to make sure the retainers didn't zing away, and they went find. All the valve seats look decent, the valves on the driver's bank have more carbon buildup on them for some reason.
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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Yeah, there is/was packed on mud everywhere. And I don't think there is a harness retaining clip they say where they didn't go "Hey, let's bust this off and then zip tie the harness down." They even ziptied some brackets in place instead of bolting them down.
 

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Yeah, there is/was packed on mud everywhere. And I don't think there is a harness retaining clip they say where they didn't go "Hey, let's bust this off and then zip tie the harness down." They even ziptied some brackets in place instead of bolting them down.
Hahaha I'm almost positive this is an oilfield truck. Thats right out of the US oilfield playbook.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
After getting the engine back on the hoist and off the engine stand, I drove out the final part, the oil galley plug, then phoned around to machine shops to find costs for cleaning and inspecting the block, heads and crankshaft. Found one that could do it by early next week, and dropped it off. Once I get the results, I can start spending more money on parts.

I still need to chuck the cam into my lathe to measure wear on it, but I expect it to be fine, and clean all the valves. I did happen to find the spring retainer that zipped away during disassembly, so now I just need to find the cap. I will wait until results come in before cleaning the pistons, as I may need new ones (I hoping to not need to bore the block out).
 
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