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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How to mount subs so they are securely fastened and easily removable.

A great suggestion as far as tips and tricks when mounting subwoofer speakers in a wooden enclosure.

The problem:
Wood screws are commonly used to secure subwoofers in place. The problem is, if you ever have to remove the subs to change the wiring or replace a blown sub often times you're left with a worn and stripped screw hole. The sub never quite screws back into place as snuggly and securely as the first time they are installed. Tighten the wood screw too much, and you're S.O.L. The screw will just spin in place.

The solution:
Trace the holes using your subwoofer as a pattern and predrill the holes. Then, put in some T-nuts and a threaded bolt so that the sub can installed and removed any number of times without damaging the enclosure.

[tyn]Things you'll need:
  • Soldering iron[/*]
  • Drill[/*]
  • Drill bit[/*]
  • Glue[/*]
  • T-nuts[/*]
  • Bolts[/*]
[/tyn]
Steps

Congratulations! You've now mounted your subs the right way. The subwoofers will stay secure in place and will be easily removable should you ever need to remove them.

More info
The sub enclosure used in this article is a Dual 12 inch down-firing prefabricated sub box by SubThump.com. 99-06 GM Extended Cab Ultra Deep MAXX Dual 12 Inch Downfire Prefabricated Subwoofer Box. To see the full product review go to [Product Review] 99-06 Ext Cab Ultra Deep MAXX Subwoofer Box. For more information on purchasing one of these amazing prefabricated custom enclosures go to http://subthump.com/Chevrolet-GMC-Sub-B ... tended-Cab
 

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That's a pretty good idea. What I did on a couple boxes was make a ring out of 1/8" steel plate and weld 1/4" bolts to it, then stick them up through the holes in the box. Lock washers and nuts keep the sub in place.

Then again, i way overbuilt everything back then. Double thickness 5/8" high density fiberboard for the boxes with 2x2 wood bracing at all the seams......
 

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From my view, if the sub is secured to the enclosure then that is the "right way". I have seen many do this t-bolt setup and it works, I am just not a fan of it, it is a bit overkill just from my point of view, you just have to use what works for your application, I wouldn't do this on every sub box I used/built.
 

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good article bro. i cant remember how many times ive had to turn my subs when reinstalling them in the past due to that same problem.
 

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It's an amazing idea, i've done it on both my sub installs and it doesn't take that much more effort than using the wood screws. I suggest doing it as well.
 

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I would say the best part about mounting them "the right way" is less chance of punching a hole through your new speaker.I remember watching my buddy put the screw and drill through the cone.... rough day for him.
 

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Im not dissing this idea at all im just curious if there is any creditability to "the right way" because I have tried this many times before and they 1. always leaked in a sealed box and when I siliconed the holes it eventually blew the silicone out 2. it was way to easy to flex the mount and create rattles all must be torqued exactly unlike wood screws 3. the nuts always back off eventually and need re torquing no matter what i did short of tack welding the nut to the screws 4. did a lot of damage to a box that I could have just turned the sub in considering it was a downfire box nobody could see anyway 5. it was just so time consuming

Like I said I like the idea because im also the type of guy who requires perfection when it comes to my truck just looking for creditability
 

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Just wanted to add my .02 - they also make threaded inserts for wood, kinda like a helicoil for metal. You drill the hole for.the insert size and press it in place. The inserts have barbs on the outer side which holds them in place... I used them I'm my sub box with a dab of epoxy and they are set for life. All the ideas previously mentioned work just as well. I mean if you really think about it, once.the subs are.set why do you need to remove them.
 

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You can do it any way you want but this and some other ideas mentioned work as well. If your like me I hate the sound of rattling in any sub situation. Its just up to you and how much EFFORT and TIME you want to put into the project. This will Determine the QUALITY of your sound. My .02 though.
 

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The t-nuts are definitely the best way to mount your subs. This made me think about the show on Velocity Channel called "Street Customs" because they just use the self tapping screws. They are supposed to be a "high end" install shop and they don't mount the subs with the t-nuts. I think it's pathetic that people are paying them "top dollar" and not even getting the best install techniques. But go figure, they are the same guys that did installs on the show "Pimp My Ride". What a joke.
 

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You are a GENIUS!! I took my system out of my 08 before I traded it in and since I will not be putting it in my new 14 for a while, I think I am going to do this to my box.
 

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Nice Idea! Don't know if I will do it or not but it is deffinately PRO-fessional! I too am anal about crooked logos! It erks me.
 

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For the comment about backing out screws, you can put ***** 1 DOT ***** of thread locker on them before installation, you will still be able to remove them, I can't remember if it's red or blue, read the package before you buy it, but there is lock-tite that can be removed if need be later. Metal on metal with the vibration from a sub wlll cause them to back out, that's normal. They do it in wood sometimes too.

Also, do not install things with a drill. With your hand, you know when it's tight, and can do that "bump" quarter turn past. With a drill, it's all helter-skelter until there is a stripped hole, with or without the torque settings... I've done it doing this, I know a hundred others who have, I've installed for 20 years now, it's not a good practice, start a hole with a drill bit that's smaller than the screw (just the shaft size, all of the thread should be sticking out past the bit), and predrill holes, then put the screws in. That ruined speaker won't happen that way, neither will wood screws stripped out.

That's all I can add, I've personally not used OP's way, but nowdays working in furniture sales, see them constantly underneath couches where feet screw in, and those Ts never back from that application lol
 

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You'd want to use blue locktite. I've also used a dab of fingernail polish if locktite wasn't available.

Sent from my LG G2
 

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Okay thanks, I thought blue, that's what comes on the furniture hardware, but I couldn't remember 100%. Never realized fingernail polish would do the trick either!!
 

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really useless IMH, even with all loud set up this isnt necessary, highly doubt yall jam out loud in here where yall have to worry about a leaking air box due to stripped screw holes
 
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