Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never had to do this before and I'm overwhelmed with the variables involved. Some time next year I expect a few towing trips where I'll be transporting cars (running condition) on a trailer.

I own a 2015 1500 Silverado with 5.3L, 3.42 gears, and a trailer brake controller.

I have plenty of time to do the research, but I'm currently stuck on what questions I should be asking. Ball mount, ball, trailer, etc.

What I'm asking for is a well regarded resource to get me started so that I can starting figuring out what my questions are. I suppose what I'm most concerned with is knowing how to select a proper trailer. I imagine that might also drive the other questions.

Could you please recommend a trustworthy resource for this clueless person to begin reading? Books, websites, etc.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
2,175 Posts
Maybe try the DMV. You probably need a little practice though with someone and learn how to backup and maneuver. Most tandem axle car haulers have 3500lb axles so should carry most any car. Depending on the weight of the trailer you should have around 6000 lb capacity. Just make sure its well built with brakes, with correct tires not passenger vehicle tires and no less than 3500lb axles.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
First thing I would do is look in the owners manual. Find out what the truck is rated to haul. Then if you have a hitch on the vehicle already. Read the hitch label and find out what the hitch is rated for. will give you a trailer GVW and a tongue weight. But there will be two numbers. The lower number is if you have a regular setup. The higher number will be if you are using a weight distribution hitch. Then once you know those numbers. Buy a hitch and a ball that will be rated for the max or just over. That way you know what you are rated to pull. Then I would be looking at the trailer setup. What kind of breaks it has axel weight ratings and ball size that it accepts. More than likely will be 2" or 2 5/16" this will also factor in the hitch that you buy as well. Because depending on the weight rating the hitch and ball shaft size could be different. So you may buy a hitch rated for 10,000LBS and a 2 5/16 ball rated for 10,000lbs but the hitch may have a shaft size of 1" and the ball may be a 1 1/4. More would need to be known about what the truck has currently to determine what could be used. If you have nothing at the current moment. I would take a look at Reese website as they have a vehicle fitment guide that will get you o the right track.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Like the others said, check the manual and maybe get some lit from the DMV. Your truck is good for about 9,000 pounds I believe. Maybe even 9,5000. Figuring a typical car weights roughly 3,500-4,000 pounds. A single axle bumper pull 20' car trailer will pry weight around 2,000? You'll be pretty close to your limit, and I'd recommend some practice. Really I'm not sure what you're concerned about....just grab a bumper pull trailer and roll. Any 16'-20' trailer with a 2" or bigger ball will do the job, in general. The "details" on specific trailers are just preferences in my opinion. I prefer a 20', dual axle trailer with a 2-5/16 hitch myself. The first week I owned my 2012 Silverado 5.3 I pulled a Toyota Tundra from watford city ND to Sheridan WY (400 miles) on a 20" dual axle trailer and a 2-5/16" ball. My new truck is a 2013 solverado 6.2 with a 5th wheel though so now that takes the cake. My brother just pulled a 1981 Chevy 3500 with a similar trailer from Vancouver Washington to Moorcroft WY (1500 miles?) with his 2014 5.3. That's my preference for long-hauls, but just short 10-20 mile runs on back roads where you don't go too fast I'm okay with anything really. I was raised in Wyoming though in a town of 1,000 and we do stuff a little redneck and reckless sometimes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Biggest thing to remember though is tires. Tires tires tires. More tires on the trailer means better load rating, meaning less weight per tire, meaning less heat buildup, meaning less strain, meaning less chance of a blowout or bulge. Whether it's dual axles with singles on each, or a single axle with dual wheels on it, I like hauling a trailer with 4 tires for stuff as heavy as a car. Also gives the trailer more weight so when you're pulling an empty trailer on the return trip, it's easier to handle and doesn't rattle your teeth out of your head and bounce all over the road like a light, 16 foot, 2 wheeled single axle.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Does your truck have the factory tow package?
Loading a car on a trailer and hauling it isn't rocket science. But there are some simple things to know, that if not known can cause a major problem.
1. You want to load a car on a trailer, so that its obviously making the truck squat down a little bit. If the bumper stops above the rear axle of your truck are touching, or close to touching then your putting too much weight on your truck. If you don't put enough on, the trailer will throw the truck around, make it sway. If the truck starts swaying, then I would pull over and move the car forward on the trailer.
2. If your loading the average car of 4,000 lbs, and the trailer is 2000lbs, then that's 6,000 lbs. If the towing capacity is 9,000 lbs, then that's not close to capacity as mentioned above.
3. Make sure the car is properly secured to the trailer. Wrap your straps and/or chains around the axles or suspension components, not around the car frame. As your going down the road, the car will bounce around and if your car is secured by something above the suspension, it could come loose. This simple thing is often overlooked. I even see professional tow truck drivers improperly securing their cars. Chain to things that don't move!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top